Tag: copyright infringement

The unauthorized use of someone else’s copyright is generally referred to as infringement. This means the use was not deemed “fair” or justifiable under any doctrine (e.g., parody).

Faulkner Goes Folksy On Fair Use

While the astute reader may have noticed that the company that owns William Faulkner’s literary rights sued Sony for copyright infringement based on a misquoted snippet of a sentence that appeared in Midnight In Paris, it was news to me when I stumbled across the article in the ABA Journal this morning. Given that I try and keep abreast of happenings in the world of copyright, and this should really have been BIG NEWS (in all caps, even), I was shocked that the coverage was so ho-hum, with nary a vitriolic diatribe to be found anywhere. Given that Wilson is time-travelling back to 1920s Paris at the time he makes the statement, it’s more a reflection of his actual condition (i.e., the past is not past because he’s currently living in the past) than a comment on Faulkner’s line of dialogue

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When Is Re-Mixing Copyright Infringement?

Several years ago, Jonathan Lethem wrote a brilliant article defending the use of "borrowing" by writers in their pursuit of new creation, arguing that creation itself necessarily calls upon the inchoate melange of what one has read over one's life as an unconscious source of style, language, allegory, sentence structure, plot, and pacing, and that -- in a sense -- imitation is the sincerest form of flattery

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